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I spent about an hour working on this image trying to get the colors right. I even worked on the image in 2 programs: Aperture and Capture One Pro 8, partly to test the programs in rendering color, partly to trina myself on the latter, and partly just to get one version that captured the extreme color accurately without going overboard.

I went to bed thinking I might not use either one, because I could not trust my eyes and my judgment having worked on it so much — I thought it would be necessary to walk away from it for a few days and maybe posta less challenging image today. But when I woke up in the morning I liked what I saw, and was also pleased that I was able to get very similar and good results from both programs. I ended up using the Aperture version you see here, just because I prefer to keep my working  catalog in one place, but the Capture One version is also perfectly fine.

This is sunset, or specifically a few moments after sunset, from a spot near the top of Cadillac Mountain in Acadia National park.

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  • LensScaperOctober 23, 2014 - 2:08 pm

    That is a stunning view, Mark. I often work on images late at night with background artificial light and leave them on screen overnight. Coming back to them fresh in the morning and seeing them by natural light more often than not confirms I got the processing right.ReplyCancel

    • MarkOctober 24, 2014 - 12:26 pm

      Hey Andy, thanks for the input and feedback. It’s images like this that cause the most uncertainty, where the natural color palette from nature is so extreme that I sometimes question whether my output is too extreme sometimes. But it’s always best to check in after a good rest, and as you point out, under natural light.ReplyCancel

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The gallery above shows three variants of the same image edited in Capture One 8 using the Film Styles for Capture One set of film presets available at the link.  I was approached by the creator Alexander Svet after I posted a review of my first impressions of Capture One Pro 7 back in the summer.

To start with some background, Capture One is a Raw processor, image editing and catalog management program published by Phase One, which is most known for its high quality and expensive medium format camera systems.  Capture One serves the same general purpose as Lightroom and Aperture. Lightroom from Adobe is the market share leader. Aperture, which has been my choice for the past 5 years, is made by Apple and is being discontinued. When Apple made that announcement about the demise of Aperture, Capture One offered an attractive price to lure people over and I took the bait. I still do not know what I will use to replace Aperture, which still works fine and should be good for most of the next year or so.

It took me a while to install and review the Capture One Film Styles set of presets because I spent most of the summer shooting and posting images taken with real film. Since then, Capture One released version 8, and fortunately the styles work equally well with both versions 7 and 8 of the Capture One Pro program. According to the product web page, they also work with Capture One Pro 6 but not Capture One Express 6 or 7, although I have not tested any of the last 3 mentioned.

The set of images in the slideshow above are the same image treated with 3 different presets from the package:
SL Kodak Ektachrome mid-1970s (red)
SL Fuji Fortia SP v1
Fuji Superia 800

As you can deduce from the names, some of the film styles have variants based on the ISO rating; other have variants simply labeled v1, v2, etc., and the Ektachrome has 3 variants based on a specific color cast.  Some of these varieties do seem to reflect specific possibilities from the original film, while others seem to have been created (this is just my guess) in order to reach the total of 100 presets, but even if that is the case the variety is welcome.  There are 58 color and 42 black and white presets in the pack.

SL Kodak Kodachrome 25

SL Kodak Kodachrome 25

One thing missing, even in the ISO variants, is any simulated grain. This is largely because Capture One was not capable of simulating grain until version 8 was very recently released. Mr. Svet informed me that he plans to release an Extended Set of the Film Styles next which might add a film grain feature.  In any event, it is now very easy to add grain from within Capture One should you desire.

SL Kodak Ektachrome 200

SL Kodak Ektachrome 200

The styles are very easy to install, and Capture One also makes it easy to organize your added styles, as long as you take a bit of care during installation. I also like how Capture One allows you the option of stacking styles when working on an image, or having a new style overwrite any previous style you applied. I am not aware that either Aperture or Lightroom has this option.

SL Agfa RSX II 100

SL Agfa RSX II 100

For the images I am showing here, I pretty much limited my edits to the Styles alone, except for minor basic adjustments such as exposure and sharpening, because I wanted to really feature their capabilities. As with any presets, however, your best practice would be to apply one of the styles as a starting point and then tweak the image to your personal preferences.

Ilford HP5 Plus 400 v3

Ilford HP5 Plus 400 v3

Overall I think this is a very tempting product for anyone looking for a preset pack for Capture One. The Lightroom market for Presets is well populated, but they have always been lacking somewhat in the Aperture and Capture One universes. I am glad that this new company has seen an opening and made these available to the Capture One community of photographers.  Many people who consider switching to Capture One explain that it is a considerable obstacle to give up their Nik plugins or VSCO One film presets. This package can help overcome that limitation.

Finally, no digital preset – and no amount of digital manipulation – can fully re-create the look of real film. Even the home page for these styles admits as such. But, as I mentioned earlier I have been using real film a lot lately and these do reasonably approximate the essence of film in a digital format. Before I fully make the images above “my own” I will undoubtedly tweak them some more, but these presets got me to a point where I was comfortable posting these shots without any regrets.  And just so you don’t have to scroll back up, the styles are available here. You also have the option to try 5 of them for free, and the direct link to the purchase page is here.

DISCLAIMER AND DISCLOSURE: I was not paid for this review, nor am I an affiliate of Capture One Styles or Capture One, and I will not receive any compensation should you purchase a copy of the presets. I was given a free copy of the styles in order to test and generate this review.

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This was harder to create than I thought it should be, and that’s one of the reasons I’m posting it even though It’s not as compelling as I hoped it would be.  My X-T1 kept exposing for the leaves in the foreground which blew out the water and sky in the background.despite my attempts to lock exposure. Eventually I switched to manual exposure to get the result I wanted.  In the end, I wasn’t sure the result was worth the effort (really, it took a long time) but I wasn’t so in love with the scene (Eagle Lake in Acadia National Park) for more traditional basic shots so I’m glad I stayed with this approach.

On another front, I realized over the weekend that the anniversary of my first blog post here was exactly 5 years ago on Saturday. I chose not to do a special Saturday post on Saturday just to mark the event, but I did want to make some mention of it – so Hurray!   I’ve made more than 1400 posts by the way. I’ve no idea how many images that represents, as I have had occasional posts with no images, some with repeats, and others with multiple photos.

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  • Michael CriswellOctober 21, 2014 - 9:01 pm

    Really like this Mark, I can definitely see the exposure issues, not with your shot but with the scene, and last but not least Happy Blogg-iversary!ReplyCancel

This shows the Bubbles, at Jordan Pond, Acadia National Park. The Bubbles are the twin pair of rounded large hills, or small mountains at the far end of the pond, which seems large enough to me to be called a Lake.

After the nXnw crew’s travel day driving up the Maine coast from Massachusetts, this was our first photo stop the next day in Acadia National Park.  We first tried – on a foggy morning – to drive up to the Cadillac Mountain lookout. We hoped we would rise above the fog and be able to capture some great long views with some dramatic fog covering the area immediately below. Instead the fog just kept getting thicker as we climbed, and the view from the top was no view at all. As a result, we were all just delighted with this vista when we drove back down. From this point forward we had great weather, great skies, and a great trip.

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“Love alone creates.”  
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  • Michael CriswellOctober 17, 2014 - 5:50 pm

    This is sweet, the blue sky reflection in the water makes this one, at least for me, well doneReplyCancel

We are still working my way up the Maine coast on the first day on the nXnw 2014 trip, and as with yesterday’s image from Perkins Cove, I find myself less than overwhelmed with what I did that day. Was it the weather, the frst full day of  my cold, or something else? I’m not sure. But this is pretty good, just not as compelling as I hoped.

I did some long exposures that didn’t turn out as well as I hoped.  Conditions were rough – not only was it cold and rainy but the wind was coming in exactly the direction for maximum interference with all our lenses, but we muddled through.  Sorry if this seems so down. I actually had a great trip but the images from this first day just aren’t hitting it for me.

The lighthouse you see here is the Ram Island Ledge Light, a privately maintained light that assists the Coast Guard in guiding ships through this harbor, where the publicly maintained and much larger Portland Head Light also sits, just outside of this frame. I was very drawn to the rocks on the left, and the water breaking on them.

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  • Michael CriswellOctober 17, 2014 - 5:48 pm

    I felt the same as you viewing my shots from that day Mark, kinda bummed at my results, but the day was a rough one so we gotta make due, getting the smaller light is great in this shot, I never considered it….one of those daysReplyCancel

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